PRESS

“His music, sculpture, collages and animation are about documenting the now as much as interpreting for posterity. Because then has always been now, and now will always be then. The stuff of archetypes — that’s what most fascinates Ming Donkey.”

“Of all the galleries hosting events that night, Young Blood was the party: It Came From Left Field is a three-person show featuring new work by Ming Donkey, Herbert Rieth III, and Jason Baldwin. And all of it is, ya know, good. The only people who should have a problem with this show are Herbert Reith and Jason Baldwin; being put in a room with the sensory explosion that is Ming Donkey’s multi-media installation is like asking to be ignored…even if your work is entirely deserving of focus, which Reith’s and Baldwin’s certainly are.”

JESSICA BLANKENSHIP . CREATIVE LOAFING ATLANTA

“In Southern California, Ming Donkey is better known as Jay Grumpy of the former Recess Records punk band The Grumpies. Now a one-man rockabilly show, Ming spends his days perfecting the washtub bass, teaching drawing at Mississippi State University and making (very affordable, somewhat political) Worker Art, which is on display at Echo Park’s L’Keg Gallery through November 20.”

CHEREE FRANCO . JUXTAPOZ

“He is a prolific artist, creating in various mediums. Arguably, Ming Donkey’s one-man band is as much performance art as it is raucous, driving roots music. His latest release as Ming Donkey on Ultra Low Fidelity vinyl epitomizes the one man approach. Touted as “written, performed, recorded, and designed one July weekend in 2009,” the album is down-home gold. For a piece of art you can tap your foot to, this album fits the bill perfectly. You can catch Triplett out and about in Starkville in various bars shrieking and thudding his way through one of his haunting incantations. ”

“Ming’s “Ballad of Franco the Kid” is overtly narrative—to that degree, he uses arrows and text to guide the viewer through Franco’s media-saturated wasteland of over-consumption, where the Mad Diners puppeteer the Workers Without Hands, who slave in uniform dissatisfaction towards their ultimate goal—the middle-class dream of Niagara.”

CHEREE FRANCO . RAZORCAKE

“Among the highlights of the night would be Ming Donkey and his impressive ability to stand alone, the Bass Drum of Death band members’ hair and the two men who attempted to sit down in the same invisible chair, fell down and screamed “You suck” at the Bass Drum of Death from the floor.”

“Waiting on the Georgia Line” is a syrupy, sludgy, lonesome blues, and at first I was expecting to hear a Bob Log III, JSBX high speed combination and instead it’s a slow, raspy Tom Waits singing in an abandoned metal shack. Ming’s more melodic, but that similar kind of growl…. or Doo Rag slowed down to 16rpm.”

JASON DEAN . 7 INCHES: NEW REVIEWS EVERY DAY

“Never in a hurry and always full of character, the Ming Donkey One Man Band mixes roots-music styles with a street artist’s sensibility.”

LARRY MORRISEY . JACKSON FREE PRESS

““Regretfully, I missed Ming Donkey One-Man Band due to a film. This became apparent to me as I entered Mojo’s to find it buzzing. It seemed that buzz was about the dirty heaps of new age blues that was being thrust upon the crowd and would continue through the night.”

ZAC EARLY . THE COMO COLLECTIVE

“This 7″ is a near ten minute single with moody and slow burning alt-country vibes, characterized by twangy and abrasive guitars. Ming’s raspy singing style only fuels the edgy feeling that’s constantly hanging over your shoulders, kind of like the music is always prepared to break off into something exceptionally heavy with plenty of dirge. There’s a wealth of confidence in the moody swagger that’s present from start to finish and the songs below show that.”

ZAC CAMAGNA . THE STYROFOAM DRONE

“…like one of (Bob) Dylan’s shitty periods.”

VINCENT BATTILANA . RAZORCAKE

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